About King

Hoehr-Grenzhausen is a little village located on the west side of the Rhine
river near Frankfurt Germany. Just a little tiny dot on the map, yet a
significant location for the history of the German beer steins. It might have
been here, where the German beer steins were first produced in the 14th
century. And it is here where you still find companies which are loyal to their
heritage of old traditions used to produce the world famous German beer
stein.
One of the largest beer stein factories is King-Werk, located right in the
heart of Hoehr Grenzhausen. King-Werk was founded in 1949 by Friedrich
Wuerfel and Edmund Mueller, a master craftsman who acquired most of his
knowledge during his employment with Marzi & Remy, a beer stein
manufacturer founded in 1860 and closed in 1990. Despite a rough start in
a very primitive production facility and their initial misadventures with Balky
Kilns, King-Werk soon thrived to be one of the leading and internationally
recognized beer stein manufacturer in Germany.
In 1968 a devastating blaze burned the factory to the ground and King-Werk
nearly became a part of history. But fortunately all important molds could be
salvaged and once again King-Werk did rise like a phoenix from the ashes,
rebuilding their factory from the ground up. This time King-Werk was able to
plan their facility from scratch and influenced by years of experience and
misadventures, they created what is perhaps the most modern pottery
factory where molding, glazing, firing and pewter lid attachment is all
consolidated under one roof. Even though the production process was
modernized, King-Werk still produces all of their steins in accordance with
traditional methods used for many hundreds of years and produces some of
the highest quality handcrafted beer steins available in Germany. To
preserve the traditions of beer stein production, King acquired historical
molds from now closed pottery manufacturers and has one of the largest
mold archives in the industry with beer stein molds dating back to the 18th
and 19th century.